Tag Archives: ACLS

Distance to hospital did not affect arrest survival

In a study of over 7500 patients with cardiac arrest transported by EMS in the United States, transport distance was not associated with survival on logistic analysis (OR 1.00; 95% CI 0.99–1.01). A geospatial assessment of transport distance and survival … Continue reading

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Kids need 'proper' CPR if non-cardiac cause of arrest

The American Heart Association recommends cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by bystanders with chest compression only for adults who have cardiac arrests, but not for children. These recommendations have new support in a large observational study from Japan examining outcomes in 5170 … Continue reading

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2000 vs 2005 VF guidelines: RCT

One of the key changes in international resuscitation guidelines between the 2000 and 2005 has been to minimise potentially deleterious hands-off time, so that CPR is interrupted less for pulse checks and DC shocks. These two approaches have been compared … Continue reading

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Is defibrillation an electric threat for bystanders?

No rescuer or bystander has ever been seriously harmed by receiving an inadvertent shock while in direct or indirect contact with a patient during defibrillation. New evidence suggests that it might even be electrically safe for the rescuer to continue … Continue reading

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Cardiocerebral resuscitation

An emergency medical service introduced a cardiocerebral resuscitation protocol and compared outcomes with a standard ACLS protocol. Cardiocerebral resuscitation (CCR) was defined as: initiation of 200 immediate, uninterrupted chest compressions at a rate of 100 compressions ⁄ min analyzing the … Continue reading

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Pre-hospital thoracotomy and aortic clamping in blunt trauma

This is one of those ‘wow they really do that!?‘ papers…Patients undergoing thoracotomy and aortic clamping for pre-hospital blunt traumatic arrest either in the field or in the ED were evaluated for the outcome of survival to ICU admission. None … Continue reading

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External jugular vein a tricky one

Emergency medicine residents and paramedics cannulated patients who were anaesthetised. The external jugular vein (EJV) took longer to cannulate and had a higher failure rate than an antecubital vein. More than a quarter of the paramedics and a third of … Continue reading

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